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AMD A10-6800K Review ....................

Antec ISK110 VESA Case Review .............................. ....................

Antec P280 Case and HCP1200 PSU ....................

Intel Ivy Bridge i7-3770K CPU

Fujifilm FinePix HS20EXR Camera

AMD Radeon HD 7870

AMD Radeon HD 7770 & 7750

AMD Radeon HD 7970 .........................

AMD Bulldozer FX-8150 CPU

ASUS EAH6970 Graphics Card

AMD Llano A8-3850 Review

Cougar GX G1050 1050W PSU

Antec HCG900 900W PSU

Rasurbo Xange Case and 550W PSU ....................

Cooler Master Storm Enforcer Case ....................

AMD Phenom II X4 980BE CPU Review

AMD 6-series Entry Level GPUs

AMD ATI Radeon HD6990 Review

Intel 510 Series 250GB SSD

ASUS ENGTX580 DCUII Review

Sapphire Radeon HD6870 Vapor-X

Antec Minuet 350 Case Review

Sapphire Radeon HD6950

Intel Sandy Bridge Processors

AMD Phenom II X4 975BE & X6 1100T

AMD Phenom II X6 1090T Thuban CPU ...............

Kingston V+ Series 128GB SSD Review

Antec P183 Case and 1000W PSU

AMD ATI Radeon 5670 Review

AMD ATI Radeon HD 5850 Review

AMD Athlon II X4 630 CPU Review

Intel Lynnfield i7-870 Processor Review

Kingston DDR3 Memory Review

ASUS Maximus III Gene Motherboard

ASUS M4A79T Deluxe Motherboard

Antec Midi Tower Case and PSU

Active Media SaberTooth SSD

More Power Protection Products ......................... ...............

DDR2 Memory Roundup

Dual Layer DVD Burners Reviewed

Dual Format DVD Burner Review

QuietPC Product Roundup

GlobalWIN Product Roundup

Sapphire Radeon 9800 AIW Pro

Athlon 64 FX-51 Review

Lian Li PC37 Aluminum Mini Tower Case ...............

Abit IS7-G Motherboard Review 

AOpen AX4C Max Review

Promise S150 TX4 RAID Controller

Silent Power Supplies Reviewed

Nvidia GeForce FX5900 Ultra ....................

Promise TX4000 RAID Controller

ASUS V9900 Ultra Review

Promise TX2Plus RAID Controller

AMD Athlon XP3200+ CPU Review

Intel Canterwood Chipset Review

ASUS P4SDX Deluxe Motherboard

Dual Athlon MP2600+ Review

Pinnacle Systems: Edition DV500

Athlon XP3000+ CPU

  ..

TwinMOS Memory

 

Leadtek K7NCR18D-Pro

Aopen CRW4850 CD Burner Review

AOpen AK77-8X Max Motherboard Review

AOpen AX4PE Max Motherboard Review

Enlight Cases Roundup

Power Protection Products Review

Creative Webcam Pro eX Review

PAPST Fans (Silent PC Part2)

AMD Athlon XP2700+ CPU

Leadtek WinFast A280 MyVIVO

Crucial PC2700 DDR333 Memory

Chieftec Wireless Desktop Review

Intel Pentium4 3.06GHz CPU with Hyper Threading Review

Hyper-Threading Technology Guide

PURE Digital SonicXplosion Sound Card

PURE Digital ZXR-500 Speaker System

Logitech Z-560 4.1-Speaker System

Global Win GAT-001 Case Review ....................

Intel Pentium 4 2.8GHz Review

Belkin Omniview 4-Pt. KVM Switch + Audio

AKASA Paxmate Acoustic Matting Installation Guide

Chieftec Winner Series: WX-01BD Case Review ..........

Cooler Master ATC-710 Case Review

80mm -> 60mm Fan Adapter

TDK USB Bluetooth Adaptor

Socket-A Cooler Roundup 

Promise FastTrak SX4000 RAID Card

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TwinMOS Memory Products Review 2nd March 2003

TwinMOS have been around since 1998 and look set to become a major player in the memory field. No one can argue with their philosophy of high quality products at rock bottom prices. If you were to do a search for DDR333 or DDR400 memory using our "find lowest prices link" above there is little doubt that twinMOS would be the cheapest branded part you could find. Even in these price conscious times people are looking for quality products and to test this aspect TwinMOS sent us the following:

  • 2 Sticks of DDR333 CL2.5 PC2700 Memory

  • 2 Sticks of DDR400 CL2.5 PC3200 Memory

  • A 256MB Compact Flash Card

Here's what they look like (you can click on these images for a larger and more detailed photo).

The second image is that of the Compact Flash card we have been using in our digital camera. We've been testing both the DDR333 and the DDR400 memory for almost a month now in a variety of test systems. In every board except our AOpen ones we were able run the memory at CL2 with perfect stability. On average a 10% overclock was achievable without any problems under a heavy load and in the following tests we have used aggressive memory settings. We quickly established that DDR333 memory actually produced better results than DDR400 memory due to the 333MHz FSB on our Athlon CPUs and synchronous memory timing and latency issues so we have used DDR333 for all of the tests. This does not mean buyers should not consider DDR400 memory - on the contrary, we recommend DDR400 as it is more future proof. The new Pentium 4 chips will use dual channel DDR400 memory and there have been rumors for a while that the new Athlons with the Barton core will quickly switch to a 400MHz FSB. After all you can still run DDR400 memory at DDR333 speeds by selecting the appropriate BIOS settings.

 

Sisoft Sandra

Let's start with the synthetic benchmarks. Readers should note these are largely dominated by factors that are not that important for most uses so they should be viewed from an academic standpoint.

 

As expected the NForce2 board is no match for the PC1066 memory in the P4 system. The twinMOS memory puts in a good showing with all the DDR chipsets. To get some idea of how it will perform on a dual channel board just double the scores since this is a synthetic benchmark.

 

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Here things have narrowed considerably here and we can see the efficiency of the Intel memory hub on the 845PE board.

 

Things are getting closer now with only the Hyper-Threading skewing figures.

 

Hyper-Threading appears to give the P4 a big boost and the Athlons struggle to keep up but its clear the TwinMOS memory is putting in a good showing.

 

3D Mark 2001

Enough synthetic benchmarks, let's see how well the memory performs in the real world.

The advantages of the 850i chipset don't help so much here. The performance of the KT400 board is disappointing but this is due to a flaw in the chipset (we're waiting for a KT400A board) rather than the memory performance.

 

Unreal Tournament 2003

Now for some real world benchmarks starting with UT2003 Flyby.

 

Matching the memory speed to the FSB speed allows the Athlon systems to pull ahead at the higher resolutions. The flaw in the KT400 board exhibits itself again as a curious bottleneck. 

 

The botmatch scores are what's really important to gamers and here the difference is even more stark. The P4s may have won in the synthetic benchmarks but well-matched low-latency DDR memory shows its superiority here.

 

Conclusion

Rambus is well and truly dead, making no appearance in any Intel roadmap and we can dismiss this as competition. Similarly we can disregard DDR2 memory as we wont be seeing it in anything other than graphics cards for a couple of years yet. This leaves most people to choose between various brands of DDR memory. Until now Crucial Technology (a division of Micron) have been quite successfully targeting their memory at consumers on the basis of price and quality. TwinMOS are now on the scene offering quality that is just as good at an even lower price point. Why pay 3 times as much for Corsair memory with the same performance and a marginal overclocking advantage? The memory we tested has been in constant use for almost a month and even in a server for several days without any problems whatsoever.

We haven't shown any tests for the Compact Flash Card because it really is impossible to tell between such cards in terms of performance. The increase of memory to 256MB in our high end Fuji camera allowed us to use the highest uncompressed settings (about 30MB per picture in TIF form). We could also fit several hundred standard resolution images on it so such a card would be ideal whilst on holiday. The card came in a sturdy plastic holder which allows several cards to be kept on hand and swapped around when full - something that will no doubt appeal to amateur and professional photographers alike.

At the end of the day the only thing consumers want from their memory is stability and all things being equal a buying decision boils down to price and here TwinMOS can't be beaten.

Memory prices are at rock bottom currently and now is an ideal time to upgrade to make full use of XP or Win2K (in our experience about twice as much memory is required to run a game in XP than with Windows 98).

We would like to thank TwinMOS for the review sample memory products.

  • To find the lowest price on TwinMOS products in Europe click here.

  • To find the lowest price on TwinMOS products in the US and elsewhere click here.

 

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